website

Websites & Apps

As a therapist and a licensed clinical social worker, I have come to feel very grateful for the number of free resources that are now available for people who are looking to heal, grow, and expand their minds. The internet has changed our world, and allowed us to travel out of our own homes with a simple click of the button. While there are definitely risks to the “internet era”, I have seen a multitude of benefits.

The Beacon House, a treatment facility in the UK, has built a wonderful website, influenced by some world renowned experts on the topics of attachment injury, developmental trauma, and PTSD. This organization offers some wonderful resources for understanding the impact of trauma on a child.

It is important to remember that for many people, their experiences with physical, emotional, developmental, or sexual trauma happened during their childhood. Often as a result, the responses we have in our adulthood may feel “childish”—but is it any wonder? Many of us are unwittingly hijacked by the child inside of us, who is stuck in time and still bearing the wounds of a particular situation or incident.  For this reason, it is extremely useful to understand what trauma feels like to a child. Please take some time to look at these handouts and review the website.  There are some real gems!

Temperament can be defined as “the combination of mental, physical, and emotional traits of a person.” or “consistent individual differences in behavior that are biologically based and are relatively independent of learning, system of values and attitudes.

Temperament is a big topic of discussion in my therapy with people. Generally, people with more sensitive, introverted temperaments seem to get hurt more easily in this world. Why is that? We live in a society that values being outgoing and confident, qualities that don’t come easily to those of us with certain temperaments. I think this is hugely useful to understand as one embarks on a healing journey. Whether you are extroverted, introverted, or don’t quite know, I think any one of us can benefit from knowing more about our basic traits.

The Myers-Briggs Indicator Type Indicator (MBTI) is a well known test that many people have taken in college courses or even in work settings. If you haven’t you can take it in a couple of ways. The official website offers some extra content and of course is the original source of the test, but there is a fee attached. Psych Central has a 16 question shortened version that should give you the same results, albeit without all of the bells and whistles. There are many people who use their personality profile as a way to understand a lot about themselves in the world.

Introvert, Dear is a website for “introverts and highly sensitive people”. Do I need to say anymore? You know who you are. This is a great resource and contains really useful and validating information. And they refer to one’s Myers-Briggs personality type a lot, so be forewarned.

Are you a Highly Sensitive Person? Dr. Elaine Aron started writing about this particular personality/temperament type over twenty years ago, describing those of us who startle easily, can’t stand the sound of chewing, get overwhelmed really easily, and find solace in silence. Check out here website and learn more!

Apps

There is an "app" and website called Insight Timer that is very helpful to anyone who is trying to develop a regular meditation practice.  It can be downloaded to your smart phone and allows free access to a healthy library of guided meditation materials.  There is a handy guide on the website that can help you understand the various styles of meditation.  It is my recommendation that anyone in therapy seek guided meditations in the groupings referenced as "Mindfulness" and "Movement".  These will help you become more connected to yourself and your body, which is of utmost importance for the process of healing. I recommend people stay away from transcendental meditations, and note that some forms of meditation can be triggering to people with trauma histories. If this sounds familiar to you, here is a podcast that you might appreciate. There is an "app" and website called Insight Timer that is very helpful to anyone who is trying to develop a regular meditation practice.  It can be downloaded to your smart phone and allows free access to a healthy library of guided meditation materials.  There is a handy guide on the website that can help you understand the various styles of meditation.  It is my recommendation that anyone in therapy seek guided meditations in the groupings referenced as "Mindfulness" and "Movement".  These will help you become more connected to yourself and your body, which is of utmost importance for the process of healing. I recommend people stay away from transcendental meditations, and note that some forms of meditation can be triggering to people with trauma histories. If this sounds familiar to you, here is a podcast that you might appreciate.